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Collecting Past Due Child Support Payments – One Possible First Step

Posted on : 17-11-2011 | By : admin | In : Developers Blog, Uncategorized

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There are some ways you can try to use to pry some past-due Child Support Payments from

your Ex.  Exploring some of those ways is one of the things we want to do here at the

DBSS.  This first one is pretty much free, which is pretty good incentive for you to

check it out.    Regardless of cost, if you are new to this predicament, I might

suggest you begin your quest for information that you might be able to transform into

dollars, then into new diapers, or college tuition, over at The U.S Department of

Health and Human Services, http://www.acf.hhs.gov/.   They kind of lay out an umbrella

of organizations and some guidelines, such like, The Office of Child Support

Enforcement (OCSE) with its major stated goal being: “The nation’s Child Support

Enforcement Program (CSE) is a Federal/State/Tribal/local partnership to help families

by promoting family self-sufficiency and child well-being.”  After that they provide a

lay of the land so to speak the highlights I quote for you right here.

“All States and territories run a child support enforcement program, usually in the

human services department, department of revenue, or the State Attorney General’s

office, often with the help of prosecuting attorneys, district attorneys, other law

enforcement agencies and officials of family or domestic relations courts. Native

American Tribes, too, can operate culturally appropriate child support programs with

Federal funding. Families seeking government child support services must apply directly

through their State/local agency or one of the Tribes running the program. Services are

available to a parent with custody of a child whose other parent is living outside the

home. Services are available automatically for families receiving assistance under the

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program.

Establishing Support Orders

States must have guidelines to determine how much a parent should pay for child

support. Child support orders can be established by a court or by an administrative

hearing process. Provisions for health insurance coverage must be included in the

support order.

Collecting Support

A parent can be required to pay child support by income withholding. Nationally, over

69 percent of child support is paid in this manner. Overdue child support can be

collected from:
• Federal and state income tax refunds
• liens placed on property
• sale of property.
When past-due child support is owed, the following may occur:
• Unpaid child support can be reported automatically to credit reporting bureaus.
• Drivers, professional, occupational and recreational licenses can be suspended

if the obligated parent is not paying required support.
• The U.S. State Department will deny a passport to someone who owes more than

$2,500 in back child support.
• Child support agencies have agreements with financial institutions to freeze

and seize accounts of those identified as owing back child support.
• In certain states and under certain circumstances, criminal actions can be

taken against chronic delinquent parents who owe large sums of child support.
This is their website http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cse/

You might want to check it out for starters.  I got the link and the map you can use

later to check out how things work in these regards in the state where you live.   More

on that later.  Here’s the link to the map to the state agencies:

http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cse/extinf.html

 

 

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